206.714.0315 bkasen@gmail.com

How The Catholic Church Documented Mother Teresa’s 2 Miracles

Hundreds of Catholics have been declared saints in recent decades, but few with the acclaim accorded Mother Teresa, set to be canonized by Pope Francis on Sunday, largely in recognition of her service to the poor in India.

“When I was coming of age, she was the living saint,” says the Most Rev. Robert Barron, the auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. “If you were saying, ‘Who is someone today that would really embody the Christian life?’ you would turn to Mother Teresa of Calcutta.”

Born Agnes Bojaxhiu to an Albanian family in the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, Mother Teresa became world-famous for her devotion to the destitute and dying. The religious congregation she established in 1950, the Missionaries of Charity, now counts more than 4,500 religious sisters around the world. In 1979, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her lifetime of service.

Humanitarian work alone, however, is not sufficient for canonization in the Catholic Church. Normally, a candidate must be associated with at least two miracles. The idea is that a person worthy of sainthood must demonstrably be in heaven, actually interceding with God on behalf of those in need of healing….Via npr.org

 

Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com