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How Spy Tech Firms Let Governments See Everything on a Smartphone

How Spy Tech Firms Let Governments See Everything on a Smartphone

How Spy Tech Firms Let Governments See Everything on a Smartphone

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/03/technology/nso-group-how-spy-tech-firms-let-governments-see-everything-on-a-smartphone.html“There’s no check on this,” said Bill Marczak, a senior fellow at the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. “Once NSO’s systems are sold, governments can essentially use them however they want. NSO can say they’re trying to make the world a safer place, but they are also making the world a more surveilled place.”

The NSO Group’s capabilities are in higher demand now that companies like Apple, Facebook and Google are using stronger encryption to protect data in their systems, in the process making it harder for government agencies to track suspects.

The NSO Group’s spyware finds ways around encryption by baiting targets to click unwittingly on texts containing malicious links or by exploiting previously undiscovered software flaws. It was taking advantage of three such flaws in Apple software – since fixed – when it was discovered by researchers last month…Read more…

 

Liberals Have No Clue How to Fix Obamacare – Reason

Liberals Have No Clue How to Fix Obamacare – Reason

Liberals Have No Clue How to Fix ObamacareObamacare enthusiasts have long been in denial that their beloved law is unworkable in anything resembling its current form. Liberals Have No Clue How to Fix Obamacare – Reason

thumbnail courtesy of reason.com

How to Fit the World’s Biggest Indoor Waterfall in an Airport

How to Fit the World’s Biggest Indoor Waterfall in an Airport

No one has ever cut a giant hole in a bagel-shaped glass roof and dropped water nine stories in the ground. Until Singapore’s Changi Airport called on a water design firm called WET. The post How to Fit the World’s Biggest Indoor Waterfall in an Airport appeared first on WIRED. How to Fit the World’s Biggest Indoor Waterfall in an Airport

thumbnail courtesy of wired.com

A Prefab Home that Mixes Design and Technology

A Prefab Home that Mixes Design and Technology

A Prefab Home that Mixes Design and Technology

http://humble-homes.com/koda-a-small-prefab-home-that-mixes-design-and-technology/Dubbed Koda, this small prefab home has been developed by the Estonia-based architecture firm, Kodasema. Since the completion of the home, they’ve been shortlisted for the Small Project Prize by the World Architecture Festival 2016. Koda was first completed and presented at a Tallinn Architecture Biennale in Autumn of 2015.

Koda was first completed and presented at a Tallinn Architecture Biennale in Autumn of 2015. The house pulls together a number of facets of design, including prefabrication and technology.

According to the architects, over 100 experts from various fields helped to create and develop the prototype. Some were enlisted to help introduce smart technologies; the house is capable of monitoring and learning from its surroundings (presumably so it can automatically adjust the heating and air-conditioning)….humble-homes.com

 

An Italian rapper, a ‘hangman’s noose’ and a $250m lawsuit: the chaotic race to build Elon Musk’s hyperloop

An Italian rapper, a ‘hangman’s noose’ and a $250m lawsuit: the chaotic race to build Elon Musk’s hyperloop

Hyperloop: exclusive look inside the race to build Elon Musk’s futuristic transport

http://www.wired.co.uk/article/hyperloop-hype-machineWIRED’s exclusive four-month investigation into Hyperloop One and Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, the two companies aiming to reinvent travel

In 2013, irked by the $68 billion (£51 billion) cost of California’s high-speed rail project, Elon Musk proposed an alternative. He called it the Hyperloop: levitating pods that would travel in near-vacuum tubes at near the speed of sound. By his calculations, a hyperloop from Los Angeles to San Francisco would take just 36 minutes and cost under $6 billion – a tenth of the cost. “Short of figuring out real teleportation, which would be awesome,” Musk declared, the hyperloop is “the only option for super-fast travel.”

Musk being Musk, the internet went crazy. Proponents argued hyperloop routes could transform economics in a way not seen since the invention of air travel, turning far-flung cities into stops on a continental tube map. Others thought the idea a sci-fi fantasy. Either way, Musk declared himself too busy running SpaceX and Tesla to build it, and instead invited anyone ambitious enough to try.

Today two startups, Hyperloop One and Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, are racing to be the first. Between them, they employ hundreds of engineers and have raised millions in venture capital. They have met with world leaders, signed deals with sovereign nations and partnered with global engineering firms. Earlier this year, WIRED set about to document their progress.

It did not go as we expected.

On a cloudless morning in May, a convoy of coaches drove out to a test site belonging to the transportation startup Hyperloop One. A sweeping, fenced-off cluster of low container buildings, the facility lies less than an hour north from Las Vegas into the Nevada desert. Fighter jets soar on thermals overhead. Sections of steel tubing, painted white, lay in the dirt. Next door, a solar farm dazzles in the sunshine….Via wired.co.uk

 

How The Catholic Church Documented Mother Teresa’s 2 Miracles

How The Catholic Church Documented Mother Teresa’s 2 Miracles

How The Catholic Church Documented Mother Teresa’s 2 Miracles

Hundreds of Catholics have been declared saints in recent decades, but few with the acclaim accorded Mother Teresa, set to be canonized by Pope Francis on Sunday, largely in recognition of her service to the poor in India.

“When I was coming of age, she was the living saint,” says the Most Rev. Robert Barron, the auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. “If you were saying, ‘Who is someone today that would really embody the Christian life?’ you would turn to Mother Teresa of Calcutta.”

Born Agnes Bojaxhiu to an Albanian family in the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, Mother Teresa became world-famous for her devotion to the destitute and dying. The religious congregation she established in 1950, the Missionaries of Charity, now counts more than 4,500 religious sisters around the world. In 1979, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her lifetime of service.

Humanitarian work alone, however, is not sufficient for canonization in the Catholic Church. Normally, a candidate must be associated with at least two miracles. The idea is that a person worthy of sainthood must demonstrably be in heaven, actually interceding with God on behalf of those in need of healing….Via npr.org

 

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